How (not) to decontaminate Japan

An article in Japan Times (2011-11-09, “Scrub homes, denude trees to wash cesium fears away”) provided advice on how to decontaminate areas affected by nuclear fallout, such as in Fukushima, Tochigi and northern Chiba prefecture. Most of the advice is sound, but some is downright alarming:

As for trees, it’s best to remove all their leaves because of the likelyhood they contain large amounts of cesium, Higaki [of University of Tokyo] said.
(…)
What should you do with the soil and leaves?
(…)
Leaves and weeds can be disposed of as burnable garbage, a Fukushima official said.

So let me get this right: you should collect all those leaves because they contain so much radioactive cesium (cesium 134 has a half life of 2 years and cesium 137 of 29 years). And then, when you have all that cesium in plastic garbage bags, you have it sent to the local garbage incinerator, so the carefully collected cesium gets spread over the whole neighbourhood again via the incinerator smokestack. That makes no sense at all.

2 thoughts on “How (not) to decontaminate Japan

  1. Yes, but how effective is that scrubbing? Is there even any data how much of the caesium is trapped in fly ash caught by electrostatic filters and how much goes up the stack?

    The extensive mercury pollution of fish caught along Japanese coastlines, which is largely due to mercury emissions from incinerators, does not exactly inspire confidence…

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